The 3 Best Griddles For Induction Cooktops

When it comes to making perfect pancakes, feeding a crowd, or doing meal prep for yourself, a griddle is often the best tool for the job. With a large, flat cooking surface, a griddle can be a versatile kitchen workhorse.

When choosing a griddle for an induction cooktop, there is an additional consideration to keep in mind, and that is the material that the griddle is made of. Induction cooktops utilize an electromagnetic field to heat pots and pans, this means that certain materials that are not magnetic (e.g. glass, copper, aluminum) will not work on an induction cooktop or induction range

Here are three great choices that can help increase your kitchen productivity.

Best Cast Iron Griddle – Le Creuset Rectangular Skinny Griddle

The enameled cast iron griddle from Le Creuset is hard to beat in just about any category. If you are familiar with the Le Creuset brand, then you know that this griddle is going to be functional, durable, and attractive.

With the same heavy-duty enamel coating as many of the company’s famed Dutch ovens and pans, you get impressive heat retention and distribution, as well as searing capabilities, all without the upkeep and care that is required of unfinished cast iron pans. 

Offering a cooking surface of 13”x8.5”, the skinny griddle is far from the largest on the market, but the unbeatable form and function easily make up for the smaller size.

While some may be tempted to opt for a reversible griddle with a grill pan on the opposite side, you have to keep in mind that induction cooktops rely primarily on the contact between the pan and cooktop surface. A pan that has a raised grill surface will not have full contact with the cooktop, resulting in low and uneven heating. 

Pros

  • Durable
  • Low maintenance
  • Dishwasher safe

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Smaller size
  • Heavy

Best Non-Stick Griddle – All-Clad HA1 Hard Anodized Nonstick Griddle

If your priorities are easy cleanup, low maintenance and you won’t be searing any steaks or burgers, then the All-Clad HA1 Hard Anodized Nonstick Griddle is the one to beat. Measuring 13”x20”, this griddle is ideal for cranking out large quantities of pancakes and eggs without breaking a sweat.

The All-Clad HA1 griddle has a PFOA-free non-stick coating which is incredibly durable and won’t leach any dangerous chemicals into the food you are cooking. While the griddle is dishwasher safe, it’s actually quite a challenge to get food stuck to that non-stick surface, which leads to a griddle that is easily wiped clean with just a towel.

This griddle functions exceptionally well when used for things like grilled cheese sandwiches, eggs, pancakes, hash browns, and large amounts of sauteed vegetables, but it is not going to excel when faced with searing meat or being used for something like a cheesesteak which requires a lot of “chopping” in the pan, as this could end up damaging the nonstick surface.

Pros

  • Non-Stick
  • Dishwasher safe
  • Large cooking area

Cons

  • Nonstick surface can be scratched/worn out
  • Limited to certain cooking duties

Best Multi-Function Griddle – Baking Steel Griddle

The Baking Steel Griddle is the new kid on the block when it comes to high-quality griddles, but I can see it standing the test of time. This griddle is a beast, measuring 18”x14” and weighing 25 pounds, the solid carbon steel griddle will easily last multiple lifetimes, especially when you consider that the company guarantees against cracks and breaks.

The Baking Steel Griddle is the only reversible griddle that made the list, and that’s because both sides are perfectly flat, which once again is important when it comes to induction cooking. The griddle side has a deep groove around the perimeter which works well to catch grease and other juices, while the other side is flat from edge to edge and is meant to be used as a pizza/baking “stone” in the oven. This means you can also store the griddle in your oven when not in use. 

This griddle retains heat at least as well as cast iron, and you can get it screaming hot for all of your searing needs. The griddle is in essence, just a solid piece of steel, and so some care must be taken in order to maintain a proper “seasoning”. The company provides great use and care instructions online, but the gist is to keep the griddle lightly oiled and avoid cleaning with soap (this means the dishwasher is off-limits). If you follow the basic guidelines provided, then this griddle should only get better with use.

The only possible downside to this griddle is that it does not have any sort of handle. This can make it quite difficult to move, especially while it’s hot, and remember, it’s going to stay hot for quite some time after cooking.

For people looking for a smaller option, they also offer an 11.5”x11.5” version which is perfect for portable, single burner induction cooktops.

Pros

  • Durable
  • Wide variety of uses
  • Large cooking surface

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Heavy
  • No handles
  • Some care/maintenance required

Conclusion

If you are looking for a griddle to use on an induction cooktop, you really can’t go wrong with any of the options on this list. Each of the three griddles listed will really shine with certain cooking tasks but may fall short in others.

Take a moment to think about what features are the most important to you. If it’s a truly nonstick griddle you want then go with the All-Clad. If you want something that can become a family heirloom and can be prominently displayed in the kitchen, then maybe it’s the Le Creuset, but if you just want a kitchen workhorse that can be beat up and will last for decades, then perhaps the Baking Steel is the way to go.

Whatever griddle you choose, I hope that this list has given some valuable insight into some of the various options and features available.

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William Mack

About the author

William is a classically trained chef, who spent years cooking in top NYC restaurants before bringing his talents home to Colorado. Now a stay-at-home dad, William has brought his passion for professional cooking home, where he continues to cook and bake for his wife and daughter.

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