Best Ceramic Frying Pan

It’s tough to find a great ceramic frying pan, and it’s not because they are don’t exist.

My experience is that most people searching for “ceramic” cookware specifically want a pan that is Teflon-free. Our challenge is that many kitchen products that are marketed as “ceramic” also contain Teflon in the nonstick coating. Their advertisements may be ambiguous or straight-up misleading about this fact.

In this article I’ll be covering ceramic frying pans made without Teflon, what you should look for when buying one, and a few of my favorites. If you’re simply looking for a library of which pans contain teflon and which don’t, you might start here instead. And if you want non-stick cookware, but don’t really care if it contains Teflon then jump over to my article on all types of nonstick cookware.

If this is all to confusing..well, just leave me a comment at the bottom of the article. I’m here for that too. For the rest of you, I hope you’ll find this to be a good primer on choosing (and using) the best ceramic frying pan for your kitchen.

Best Overall
Vesuvio Ceramic Coated Nonstick Frying Pan, 13 Inch | Heat Resistant Silicone Handle | Durable, High Heat Aluminum Base with No PTFE, PFOA, Lead or Cadmium | Oven & Dishwasher Safe | Made In Italy
Runner Up
GreenPan Paris 10 Inch Ceramic Non-Stick Fry Pan - Gray
Bargain Pick
GreenLife Soft Grip Healthy Ceramic Nonstick, Frying Pan, 12", Turquoise
Best For Induction
The 10” Green Earth Frying Pan by Ozeri, with Smooth Ceramic Non-Stick Coating (100% PTFE and PFOA Free)
Vesuvio Ceramic Coated Nonstick Frying Pan, 13 Inch | Heat Resistant Silicone Handle | Durable, High Heat Aluminum Base with No PTFE, PFOA, Lead or Cadmium | Oven & Dishwasher Safe | Made In Italy
GreenPan Paris 10 Inch Ceramic Non-Stick Fry Pan - Gray
GreenLife Soft Grip Healthy Ceramic Nonstick, Frying Pan, 12", Turquoise
The 10” Green Earth Frying Pan by Ozeri, with Smooth Ceramic Non-Stick Coating (100% PTFE and PFOA Free)
$89.00
$59.22
$24.99
$26.43
Best Overall
Vesuvio Ceramic Coated Nonstick Frying Pan, 13 Inch | Heat Resistant Silicone Handle | Durable, High Heat Aluminum Base with No PTFE, PFOA, Lead or Cadmium | Oven & Dishwasher Safe | Made In Italy
Vesuvio Ceramic Coated Nonstick Frying Pan, 13 Inch | Heat Resistant Silicone Handle | Durable, High Heat Aluminum Base with No PTFE, PFOA, Lead or Cadmium | Oven & Dishwasher Safe | Made In Italy
$89.00
Runner Up
GreenPan Paris 10 Inch Ceramic Non-Stick Fry Pan - Gray
GreenPan Paris 10 Inch Ceramic Non-Stick Fry Pan - Gray
$59.22
Bargain Pick
GreenLife Soft Grip Healthy Ceramic Nonstick, Frying Pan, 12", Turquoise
GreenLife Soft Grip Healthy Ceramic Nonstick, Frying Pan, 12", Turquoise
$24.99
Best For Induction
The 10” Green Earth Frying Pan by Ozeri, with Smooth Ceramic Non-Stick Coating (100% PTFE and PFOA Free)
The 10” Green Earth Frying Pan by Ozeri, with Smooth Ceramic Non-Stick Coating (100% PTFE and PFOA Free)
$26.43


Best Overall: Vesuvio 13 Inch Professional Frypan by DaTerra Cucina

The Vesuvio was among the longest lasting pans we reviewed. The construction is solid, but at 4.7 lbs is not overly heavy. We like the 13” version to feed a family, but you can also purchase a 9.5” or 11” pan if you have fewer mouths to feed.

We were impressed by the responsiveness of the brand to user feedback and questions. They publish video tutorials in response to owner questions, like “how to revive lost pan.”

Vesuvio is not a good fit for induction surfaces. Still, we felt the combination of performance, durability, and customer service were worthy of our top spot. 

Features

  • 9.5”, 11”, 13” Sizes
  • Oven safe to 450 F
  • Solid aluminum base.
  • One year manufacturer warranty.
  • 2.5” depth.
  • Sturdy feeling 4.75 lbs.
  • Only the 11” pan comes with a lid.
  • Not a fit for induction cooktops.

Runner Up: Greenpan Paris 10 Inch Frypan

The Paris pan has generally good workmanship, and cooks evenly. It did lose points on performance because of a design decision. The  stainless steel handle is heavy enough that it causes the pan to tip or lean on some surfaces.

If your top priority is materials safety, Greenpan may be the brand for you. They publish materials info and safety testing details that are best in class.

Features

  • 8”, 10”, 12” Sizes, also available as a set.
  • Thermolon coating.
  • Lightweight at 1.9 lbs.
  • Good workmanship and heat spreading.
  • Not a fit for induction cooktops.
  • Heavy handle that can cause the pan to tip.

Bargain Pick: GreenLife Softgrip 8 Inch Frypan

The GreenLife Softgrip is an excellent entry-level ceramic frying pan, for the price. The cook surface is silicon-based ceramic atop an even heating aluminum core. Owners love the white color because it provides extra contrast to see the done-ness of their food.

Spray oils are a definite ‘no-no’ for this pan. They tend to quickly build up residue and impact pan performance. And while the soft grip Bakelite handle provides a comfortable feel to the pan, it may be less fitting for use in the oven or a gas stove.

Features

  • 7 Color Options.
  • 8” and 12” Sizes.
  • White interior helps in low light.
  • Aluminum construction with a Thermolon cook surface.
  • Oven safe to 350 F
  • Some issues with the handle overheating on a gas burner.
  • Do not cook over medium heat.
  • No lid available.

Best For Induction: Green Earth 10 Inch Frypan by Ozeri

The Green Earth frypan is one of the few induction-compatible ceramic pans that don’t cost a fortune. Maintain it properly and it will serve you well. Unfortunately most owners don’t find this pan particularly forgiving when it comes to durability.

The pan does not distribute heat well if the edges fall beyond the width of your heat element. Be sure to select sizing that fits your cook surface.

Features

  • 8”, 10”, 12” Sizes, also available as a set.
  • Weighs 2.6 lbs
  • Induction compatible.
  • Aluminum construction with Sol Gel Ceramic Coating.
  • No lid available.

Other Options That Are Great

T-fal Initiatives 2-Pieces Frypan Set

These are good pans, but they wear out quickly. Expect buildup of residue over the first 6-8 months. It is difficult to clean and lessens the non stick performance. Some owners report their pan was warped upon delivery.  Overall, the Initiatives pan performs well, but from our view it’s not worth the risk of manufacturing defects.

Gotham Steel 12.5-Inch Ceramic Copper Frypan

Another pan with some positive attributes, but that doesn’t live up to it’s advertising claims. The Ti-Cerama coating offers better than average scratch resistance, but has not stood up to metal utensils for many owners.

The 90 day product guarantee is only honored when you purchase directly from the supplier. Plus, you are responsible for the cost of shipping on returns, plus a processing and handling fee. Yuck.

Blue Diamond 10-Inch Frypan

This pan performed similarly to our bargain pick, but is priced slightly higher. The hollow metal handle can also get hot quickly. We recommend buying a handle sleeve for the pan if you choose the Blue Diamond. Many owners suggest an annual replacement schedule for this pan.

Red Copper 10-Inch Skillet

The Red Copper pan needs a little help for the non-stick to perform. Definitely season it before use. Season it twice if you have time and want excellent performance. You will need to do periodically across the life of the pan.

Granitestone, 10-Inch Skillet

We like that the Granitestone Skillet comes with a mini-skillet (5.5”) companion. It does feel like extra value for the money, but the size of the mini-skillet only works well for a single egg. We find that in most cases that simply isn’t enough. Owners say this pan does not distribute heat evenly, and can be challenging to clean.


Buyers Guide: How To Choose The Best Ceramic Frying Pan

Dessert served in a non-stick pan.

Is ceramic the best material for your pan?

If you are reading this article, it’s likely you already know that ceramic is right for you. Ceramic pans are easy to clean, cost friendly, and non-stick when maintained properly. 

Before purchasing, you should also be aware that ceramic pans are not known for their durability. Even the best products tend to scratch, chip or wear faster than other types of cookware. It is common that ceramic cookware will last 2 years or less.

If you’re comfortable with the strengths and challenges of ceramic cookware then this is the article for you. If you’re seeking non-stick performance and greater durability, then you might consider traditional nonstick options.

Is a frying pan actually the best pan for your needs?

A frying pan, also known as a skillet or fry pan, is a shallow pan with a flat bottom. The sides of the pan rise from the cooking surface at a low angle or curve. 

Frying pans are great for frying, flipping, and sauteing food. They work well for eggs, omelets, single pancakes, stir fry vegetables, and pan searing meat. 

If you need a pan that holds liquid then you may consider using a saute pan instead. These are also great for cooking larger dishes or across longer periods of time.

The primary difference between a frying pan and saute pan is the angle of the pan sides. The edges of a saute pan rise perpendicular to the cook surface, compared to the low angle rise of a frying pan’s side. 

Saute pans are excellent for reducing sauces, braising meat or greens. They are also capable of slow cooking wet dishes like curry or black beans at low temperatures.

Does it work on your cook surface?

Be familiar with the cook surface you intend to use with your frying pan. Before purchasing a new pan confirm that the product you select works well on that surface. 

Cooktop compatibility will be most critical if you use an induction surface. Few ceramic non-stick products contain magnetic material which is required for induction compatibility. 

To determine if your current cookware is induction compatible, try sticking a magnet to it. If it sticks, it should work; if it doesn’t, most likely it is not induction compatible.

What size pan is the best fit for your needs?

Frying pans are commonly sized between 8” and 12”, measured by the diameter across the top edge of the pan. Because of this the actual cooking surface will be smaller than the advertised pan size.

As a general rule, it is helpful to use a pan with a diameter within 2” of your burner size for even cooking. 

If your pan is much smaller than the burner size, the handle may overheat and melt the grip or become a burn hazard. Make this a special consideration if you are using a gas cooktop.

In our view, it’s more important to size your pan for the type of food you intend to cook rather than worrying about your cooktop specifications. Matching pan and portion sizes will provide maximum temperature control and help you conserve cooking oils.

Size of PanOptimal Uses
8”The perfect size for an omelet, two fried eggs, a single crepe or pancake.
10”Great for scrambled eggs, sauce reduction, and bacon.
12”Great for stir fry, reheating leftovers, and portions for more than 2 people.

Where will you store it?

One of the goals of this website is to help our readers get the most from their kitchen by minimizing clutter. Thinking about where you will store your frying pan is just as important as considering how you will use it.

If this is a daily use item, consider leaving it on the back burner of your cooktop.

If this is an occasional use item, find available cabinet space that doesn’t require you to stack this pan with other cookware. It will help your pan last longer. Or consider purchasing a pan with a handle-loop that can hang from a hook on the wall.

Do you need it to match a specific kitchen aesthetic?

Ceramic cookware brands offer a variety of colors, handles and finishes. If you want a pan that stands out, you can easily find one. If you want a pan that fits in, you can find that too.

It is common for metal components of ceramic pans to stain, such as bolts that fasten a handle to the cook surface. This is especially common if high cook temperatures are used with a pan, or if the pan is not cleaned frequently.

What are you willing to spend for a 2-year product lifespan?

You can find ceramic non-stick frying pans to fit a variety of budgets. Most pans retail in the $20-100 range. 

Product lifespan for ceramic nonstick cookware is usually less than 2 years. When budgeting, consider that you may need to a replacement on a near(ish) time horizon.


How To Extend The Life Of Your Pan

Given the durability of most ceramic pans, it’s important to know a few basic care tips to maximize the lifespan of yours.

Let your pan slowly cool on the stovetop.

The #1 killer here may be owners dropping their pan in the sink before it is uniformly cool. 

Your ceramic pan is constructed of several layers of different material. When they cool at different speeds layers may pull apart or wear more quickly. 

Clean your pan by hand.

After you pan cools, wipe it down with a paper towel or damp cloth. In most cases that is all you need to do.

For heavier cleaning, wash the pan using soap, water, and the soft side of a sponge. Be gentle. Even brush scrubbers or the tough side of a sponge may be abrasive enough to lessen the life of your pan. 

Some pans claim to be “dishwasher safe.”   Manufacturer recommendations don’t often account for chemicals used in some dish detergents. Heavy mineral content in tap water may also decrease pan life, as well as prolonged exposure to hot water.

We recommend hand washing all ceramic pans.

Use silicone utensils.

Some pans claim to be safe for metal utensil use, but we recommend against it in all cases. 

Silicone utensils perform better in frying pans. Silicone is generally less expensive than metal or wooden utensils.  It also creates less wear on your cook surface compared to other utensil types.

Never cook above medium heat.

Have you ever felt impatient and cranked your stovetop to a high setting to shave off a few minutes of cook time? We certainly have, and the time savings are usually minimal. Stay below medium-high and your pan will live longer.

Avoid aerosol sprays and low heat oils.

Low heat oils and aerosol sprays are likely to leave a sticky buildup on the surface of your pan. This includes olive oils, extra virgin coconut oil, and butter. The residue (and the muscle needed to clean it) will erode your cook surface.

Don’t stack your ceramic pans.

Placing a hard pan bottom atop a fragile ceramic surface will scratch or weaken it. Damage occurs from both friction and impact.


Factors That I considered

Our ranking criteria focused on features that are universally important. 

Materials Selection

Materials selection is important for your health and safety. Most ceramic pans sold today are actually “ceramic coated.” This means the pan is constructed of metal with ceramic glaze atop the cook surface.

The FDA has identified that some decorative glazes may contain lead or cadmium which can leach into food at toxic levels.

In our view, you should also avoid pans that were manufactured using PFAS or PFOA. Some recent studies have linked these materials to health conditions. 

Durability

We considered how each product held up against the normal wear and tear of daily use. We sought owner feedback about breakage, corrosion, and overall resilience of the cook surface.

Cooktop Performance

We considered if each product cooks evenly, works on a variety of cooktops, and operates at common temperatures.

Pan Maintenance

We tracked down faulty components, usage limitations, and care instructions for each product.

My Recommendations

When it comes to ceramic non-stick frying pans, you can choose to spend a little more and get a decent pan for your money. You can also spend quite a lot of money, but the reality is that even premium ceramic pans generally don’t last more than a few years.

Of the 11 products we reviewed, the best pan in terms of durability, performance, ease of maintenance and price was the Vesuvio Professional Frypan by DaTerra Cucina. We especially liked the level of customer service offered by the brand to help owners get their pan performing at a high level. We also liked that the Vesuvio offers a 13” size to feed many mouths.

If you are comfortable spending a little more for performance, we recommend the Scanpan PRO IQ. Most owners say this pan has double the lifespan of middle-budget options. For us, this more than justifies the extra cost.

As always, feel free to add a comment below with your experience or to suggest a pan that we might add to our review for next year.

If you’ve used any of these brands, or another that we missed, let us know what you think about your experience in the comments below.

Photo of author

David Lewis

About the author

David is the creator of Kitchen Ambition, and has been cooking seriously for about 10 years. Originally from the American South, the spirit of bringing people together fueled his passion for cooking.

2 thoughts on “Best Ceramic Frying Pan”

  1. Just to let you know that I am looking to replace my 14 years old (no typo on the 14) ceramic frying pans that I purchased at Zellers. The brand name is EarthChef. Considering your 2 year replacement warning, I must have been doing something right all these years.

    Reply
    • Hi Elizabeth, 14-years is an amazing lifespan and not something I’ve encountered with ceramic frying pans – particularly of that era. I wasn’t familiar with EarthChef brand before your comment, but I do know a bit the parent company that makes it (BergHOFF).

      From what I discovered, Zellers where you purchased your set was actually one of the initial distribution partners to bring that line to Canada. All of the EarthChef products I found are clad stainless steel rather than ceramic, so it’s possible the ceramic models were discontinued.

      But it is definitely true that class stainless steel cookware (like carbon steel or cast iron), will last forever. It’s the most frequent cookware material you’ll find in commercial kitchens because it will take a beating and keep going. It does tend to be more expensive than ceramic cookware, though the price on BergHOFF EarthChef is very affordable compared with a lot of other options.

      Thanks again for sharing! And I hope you get another 14 years out of your next set.

      Reply

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